What Is Correct James Or James’S?

Is it Thomas or Thomas’s?

The important thing to remember is that Thomas is singular.

When you’re talking about more than one, you first form that plural by adding -ES.

One Thomas, two Thomases.

Then, to note that something is owned by more than one Thomas, just take the plural and make it possessive: Thomases’..

Is S’s correct?

Use an apostrophe + S (‘s) to show that one person/thing owns or is a member of something. Yes, even if the name ends in “s,” it’s still correct to add another “‘s” to create the possessive form. It is also acceptable to add only an apostrophe to the end of singular nouns that end in “s” to make them possessive.

How do you pluralize Chris?

First names aren’t usually pluralized in conversation, but it is grammatically correct to do so. As to the form of Chrises, since the word ends in -s, the plural form is -es. Names are treated like common nouns when you create the plural or possessive form. (Things that belong to Chris are Chris’s things.)

What is possessive case with example?

Using Apostrophes to Form Possessive NounsTypeExamplePossessive Casesingular noundogdog’s dinnerplural noundogsdogs’ dinnersingular noun ending -sChrisChris’ hat or Chris’s hatplural noun not ending -sPeoplePeople’s rights

What is plural or possessive?

Plural means more than one, which requires adding only an “s” at the end of most words. Example: snake becomes snakes (more than one snake). There is no apostrophe here. Possessive means ownership, which requires inserting an apostrophe before the “s.” Example: snake’s tongue.

How do you write the possessive form of a name ending in s?

The general rule is that the possessive of a singular noun is formed by adding an apostrophe and s, whether the singular noun ends in s or not. The possessive of a plural noun is formed by adding only an apostrophe when the noun ends in s, and by adding both an apostrophe and s when it ends in a letter other than s.

Is it Chris’s or Chris ‘?

Which is correct, Chris’s chair or Chris’ chair? James’s car or James’ car? Actually, both ways are correct. If a proper name ends with an s, you can add just the apostrophe or an apostrophe and an s.

Do I put an apostrophe after my last name?

When making your last name plural, you don’t need to add an apostrophe! The apostrophe makes the name possessive. … If your last name ends in -s, -z, -ch, -sh, or -x, you add -es to your last name to make it plural. For example: Happy Holidays from the Joneses!

What is a possessive apostrophe example?

An apostrophe used before the letter s to show ownership. For example, ‘This is Sally’s coat’.

How do you pluralize the last name Jones?

You make Jones plural by adding “es” because it ends in “s,” but adding an apostrophe and “s” after that would make it difficult to pronounce (Joneseses) so you just add the apostrophe. Again, the main thing to remember is not to change the basic spelling of a person’s name.

Is it James or James’s?

Commentary: both James’ birthday and James’s birthday are grammatically correct. Remember: it’s up to you! Use the version which best matches how you would pronounce it. Use James’s if you pronounce it “Jamesiz”, but use James’ if you pronounce it “James”.

Is it Jones’s or Jones?

The plural of Jones is obviously not Jones or Jones’, it’s Joneses. … All the English style guides insist that singular possessives are formed with -‘s and plurals with only -‘, so the possessive of Jones (singular) is Jones’s and the possessive of Joneses is Joneses’.

What is the correct possessive form of Jesus?

Some say that you should just add an apostrophe at the end, so you would write “Jesus’ words” and “Charles’ job“. And then other books say that you should follow the same rules as any other name or any other noun, and add apostrophe, “s”. So you would write, “Jesus’s” …

What are the 5 examples of apostrophe?

Apostrophe ExamplesTwinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. ( … O holy night! … Then come, sweet death, and rid me of this grief. ( … O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth. ( … Roll on, thou deep and dark blue Ocean – roll! ( … Welcome, O life!More items…•Aug 22, 2017

How do you pluralize someone’s last name?

How to Pluralize Last NamesRule #1: A last name is always written out in its entirety. … Rule #2: You never need an apostrophe when signing or addressing cards. … If the name ends in s, z, ch, or sh, add es. … If the name ends in x, add es—unless the x is silent. … RELATED: Thank-You Notes Are Important—Here’s How to Write the Perfect One.Nov 26, 2019

Where does the go to show ownership?

An apostrophe is a small punctuation mark ( ‘ ) placed after a noun to show that the noun owns something. The apostrophe will always be placed either before or after an s at the end of the noun owner. Always the noun owner will be followed (usually immediately) by the thing it owns. 2.

How do you write the possessive of James?

To form the possessive of a noun that ends in S, AP style has separate rules for proper names and generic nouns. For proper names like James, AP says, add an apostrophe only: He borrowed James’ car. For generics like boss, add an apostrophe plus S: He borrowed the boss’s car.

What is a possessive in grammar?

A noun names a person, place, thing, idea, quality or action. A possessive noun shows ownership by adding an apostrophe, an “s” or both. To make a single noun possessive, simply add an apostrophe and an “s.” Wedding rings and vows as examples of possessive nouns.

Is it Chris’s birthday or Chris birthday?

The truth is that Chris takes just an apostrophe only if you follow the rules in the The Associated Press Stylebook. In other style guides, Chris takes an apostrophe and an s: Chris’s.

What is a possessive form examples?

It is clear that the pencil belongs to the boy; the ‘s signifies ownership. The cat’s toy was missing. The cat possesses the toy, and we denote this by use of an apostrophe + s at the end of cat. … Plural nouns ending in an s simply take an apostrophe at the end to form a possessive noun.

Is it the Smiths or the Smith’s?

The Smiths is plural for “Smith” and means there is more than one person named Smith and the invitation is from them all. When in doubt, we like to use “The Smith Family”. The Smith’s (with an apostrophe before the s) is the possessive of “Smith” and indicates one person ownership.